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Genetic analysis of baboons provides evidence that ancient Punt and Adulis were the same place

In Ancient Egypt, the hamadryas baboon was one of the animals that represented Thoth, the god of the Moon, wisdom, knowledge, writing, hieroglyphs, science, magic, art and judgment.

New study suggests that prehistoric women were hunters too

According to a study published in Scientific American and the journal American Anthropologist, women were also hunters during the palaeolithic period.

Genome study reveals that Iceman Ötzi had dark skin and male pattern baldness

Ötzi, also known as the Iceman, is a naturally mummified human who lived between 3350 and 3105 BC.

Study suggests Vlad the Impaler suffered from hemolacria “crying tears of blood”

According to a new study by researchers from the University of Catania, Vlad III Dracula, also known as Vlad the Impaler, suffered from hemolacria, a condition that causes a person to produce tears that are partially composed of blood.

Study establishes connection between the cultural and genetic evolution of early Europeans

A recent DNA study has revealed intricate patterns of intermingling among various groups during the European Stone Age, shedding light on both instances of intermixing and isolation.

Coronavirus outbreak: a new mapping tool that lets you scroll through timeline

In the final weeks of 2019, a virus slipped furtively from animal to human somewhere in the Chinese city of Wuhan.

New study identifies Neanderthal ancestry in African populations and describes its origin

When the first Neanderthal genome was sequenced, using DNA collected from ancient bones, it was accompanied by the discovery that modern humans in Asia, Europe and America inherited approximately 2% of their DNA from Neanderthals -- proving humans and Neanderthals had interbred after humans left Africa.

Researchers develop method to assess geographic origins of ancient humans

Working with lead isotopes taken from tooth enamel of prehistoric animals, researchers at the University of Arkansas have developed a new method for assessing the geographic origins of ancient humans.

Archaeologists analyse the composition of a Roman-era makeup case

A study carried out by researchers from the Merida Consortium, the University of Granada (UGR) and the Institute of Cultural Heritage of Spain has...

Life’s Frankenstein beginnings

When the Earth was born, it was a mess. Meteors and lightning storms likely bombarded the planet's surface where nothing except lifeless chemicals could survive.

Ancient ‘chewing gum’ yields insights into people and bacteria of the past

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have succeeded in extracting a complete human genome from a thousands-of-years old "chewing gum". According to the researchers, it is a new untapped source of ancient DNA.

Justinianic plague not a landmark pandemic?

Researchers now have a clearer picture of the impact of the first plague pandemic, the Justinianic Plague, which lasted from about 541-750 CE.

Researchers say animal-like embryos preceded animal appearance

Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors before diversifying into 30-40 distinct anatomical designs.

Early DNA lineages shed light on the diverse origins of the contemporary population

A new genetic study carried out at the University of Helsinki and the University of Turku demonstrates that, at the end of the Iron Age, Finland was inhabited by separate and differing populations, all of them influencing the gene pool of modern Finns.

Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity

The study, published on the ancient DNA of individuals from Rome and adjacent regions in Italy, spanning the last 12,000 years.

Stanford scientists link Neanderthal extinction to human diseases

Growing up in Israel, Gili Greenbaum would give tours of local caves once inhabited by Neanderthals and wonder along with others why our distant cousins abruptly disappeared about 40,000 years ago.

Humanity’s birthplace: why everyone alive today can call northern Botswana home

Where was the evolutionary birthplace of modern humans? The East African Great Rift Valley has long been the favoured contender – until today.

Existence of a prehistoric settlement in the south of Álava is confirmed

The magnetic survey carried out, between the end of September and the start of October, in the area “Los Cascajos” (Tobera, Berantevilla), directed by Andoni Tarriño, a geologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has confirmed the existence of a Neolithic-Chalcolithic settlement in the south of Álava, one of the few settlements of this chronology found to date in the País Vasco.

Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic

An international team of researchers has analyzed remains from ten archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia, and Switzerland to gain insight into the different stages of the second plague pandemic (14th-18th centuries) and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death.

First glimpse at what ancient Denisovans may have looked like, using DNA methylation data

If you could travel back in time 100,000 years, you'd find yourself living among multiple groups of humans, including anatomically modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans.

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