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Ancient DNA reveals new insights into prehistoric Log Coffin culture

The Log Coffin culture emerged during the Iron Age in the highlands of Pang Mapha, northwestern Thailand.

Study reveals new genetics insights into inhabitants of Teōtīhuacān

A new genetic study has used the latest DNA sequencing techniques to reveal the entire mitochondrial genome sequences of the ancient Teōtīhuacāns.

Genetic analysis of baboons provides evidence that ancient Punt and Adulis were the same place

In Ancient Egypt, the hamadryas baboon was one of the animals that represented Thoth, the god of the Moon, wisdom, knowledge, writing, hieroglyphs, science, magic, art and judgment.

New study suggests that prehistoric women were hunters too

According to a study published in Scientific American and the journal American Anthropologist, women were also hunters during the palaeolithic period.

Genome study reveals that Iceman Ötzi had dark skin and male pattern baldness

Ötzi, also known as the Iceman, is a naturally mummified human who lived between 3350 and 3105 BC.

Scientists can now edit multiple genome fragments at a time

Scientists can now edit multiple sites in the genome at the same time to learn how different DNA stretches co-operate in health and disease.

Scientists have discovered the origins of the building blocks of life

Rutgers researchers have discovered the origins of the protein structures responsible for metabolism: simple molecules that powered early life on Earth and serve as chemical signals that NASA could use to search for life on other planets.

New study reveals early evolution of cortex

Their researches on the lamprey brain has enabled researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden to push the birth of the cortex back in time by some 300 million years to over 500 million years ago, providing new insights into brain evolution. The study is published in the scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

El Algar Bronze Age diet of and farming strategy reconstructed using integrative isotope analysis

The El Algar society thrived in complex hilltop settlements across the Iberian Peninsula from 2200-1550 cal BCE, and gravesites and settlement layouts provide strong evidence of a marked social hierarchy.

What tooth tartar taught us about baboons kept captive in ancient Egypt

Many people know it’s important to clean their teeth to prevent a build-up of dental plaque. This sticky film growing on teeth every day is composed of millions of bacteria.

Paleontologists Discover Solid Evidence of Formerly Elusive Abrupt Sea-level Jump

Meltwater pulses (MWPs) known as abrupt sea-level rise due to injection of melt water are of particular interests to scientists to investigate the interactions between climatic, oceanic and glacial systems.

Producing human tissue in space

On 6 March at 11:50 PM EST, the International Space Station resupply mission Space X CRS-20 took off from Cape Canaveral (USA).

Sticky tape: A key ingredient for mapping artifact origins

Researchers at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science in Japan have demonstrated that combining a highly sensitive sulfur analysis technique with simple sulfur-free tape is an effective and harmless way to test extremely small samples of vermilion from artifacts that are thousands of years old.

Experts discover toolkit to repair DNA breaks linked to aging, cancer and MND

A new 'toolkit' to repair damaged DNA that can lead to ageing, cancer and Motor Neurone Disease (MND) has been discovered by scientists at the Universities of Sheffield and Oxford.

Why do men (and other male animals) tend to die younger? It’s all in the Y chromosome

According to popular theory, men live shorter lives than women because they take bigger risks, have more dangerous jobs, drink and smoke more, and are poor at seeking advice from doctors.

New insights into the transatlantic slave trade on African ancestry in the Americas

The Transatlantic Slave Trade transported more than 9 million Africans to the Americas between the early 16th and the mid-19th centuries.

Survival of the fittest: How primate immunodeficiency viruses are evolving

Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) discover a novel mechanism by which immunodeficiency viruses evolved over time to evade the protective measures of the host.

Researchers reconstruct migration movements through ancient DNA

The Mediterranean Sea has been a major route for maritime migrations as well as frequent trade and invasions during prehistory, yet the genetic history of the Mediterranean islands lacks detailed documentation, despite recent developments in the study of ancient DNA.

Oldest reconstructed bacterial genomes link farming, herding with emergence of new disease during Neolithic revolution

The Neolithic revolution, and the corresponding transition to agricultural and pastoralist lifestyles, represents one of the greatest cultural shifts in human history, and it has long been hypothesized that this might have also provided the opportunity for the emergence of human-adapted diseases.

Ancient DNA from Sardinia reveals 6,000 years of genetic history

A new study of the genetic history of Sardinia, a Mediterranean island off the western coast of Italy, tells how genetic ancestry on the island was relatively stable through the end of the Bronze Age, even as mainland Europe saw new ancestries arrive.

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