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Justinianic plague not a landmark pandemic?

Researchers now have a clearer picture of the impact of the first plague pandemic, the Justinianic Plague, which lasted from about 541-750 CE.

Researchers say animal-like embryos preceded animal appearance

Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors before diversifying into 30-40 distinct anatomical designs.

Early DNA lineages shed light on the diverse origins of the contemporary population

A new genetic study carried out at the University of Helsinki and the University of Turku demonstrates that, at the end of the Iron Age, Finland was inhabited by separate and differing populations, all of them influencing the gene pool of modern Finns.

Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity

The study, published on the ancient DNA of individuals from Rome and adjacent regions in Italy, spanning the last 12,000 years.

Stanford scientists link Neanderthal extinction to human diseases

Growing up in Israel, Gili Greenbaum would give tours of local caves once inhabited by Neanderthals and wonder along with others why our distant cousins abruptly disappeared about 40,000 years ago.

Humanity’s birthplace: why everyone alive today can call northern Botswana home

Where was the evolutionary birthplace of modern humans? The East African Great Rift Valley has long been the favoured contender – until today.

Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic

An international team of researchers has analyzed remains from ten archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia, and Switzerland to gain insight into the different stages of the second plague pandemic (14th-18th centuries) and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death.

Scotland’s genetic landscape echoes Dark Age populations

The DNA of Scottish people still contains signs of the country's ancient kingdoms, with many apparently living in the same areas as their ancestors did more than a millennium ago, a study shows.

Genes reveal kinship between 3 victims of Mongol army in 1238 massacre

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Archaeology have used DNA testing to prove close genetic kinship between three individuals buried in a mass grave following the capture of the Russian city Yaroslavl by Batu Khan's Mongol army in 1238.