new1
29 Jun 2015

Research shows how Spanish colonists changed life in the Middle Rio Grande Valley

Spanish settlement of the Middle Rio Grande Valley in New Mexico changed the way people lived, but a new paper in the journal “The Holocene” by UNM Assistant Professor of Anthropology Emily Jones, suggests the change did not come quickly.

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trade
29 Jun 2015

Tracking the fortunes of the UK antiques trade online

A new online, interactive map has been launched which tracks the development and history of the UK antiques trade during the 20th century.

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Courtesy of Robin Wordsworth Caption: Conceptual rendition of the competing warm and cold scenarios for early Mars
29 Jun 2015

Unveiling the ancient climate of Mars

The high seas of Mars may never have existed. According to a new study that looks at two opposite climate scenarios of early Mars, a cold and icy planet billions of years ago better explains water drainage and erosion features seen on the planet today.

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PEB1
26 Jun 2015

New data uncovered on Bronze Age humans’ diet and the arrival of new crops in the Iberian Peninsula

Researchers from the universities of Granada, Santiago de Compostela and Reading (UK) have studied human skeletal remains from the Cova do Santo collective burial cave in northwestern Spain.

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This skull of a scarlet macaw (Ara macao) was excavated from Pueblo Bonito in New Mexico by researchers from the American Museum of Natural History in 1897. Credit : AMNH/D. Finnin
25 Jun 2015

Scarlet macaw skeletons point to early emergence of Pueblo hierarchy

New work on the skeletal remains of scarlet macaws found in an ancient Pueblo settlement indicates that social and political hierarchies may have emerged in the American Southwest earlier than previously thought.

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Credit : Simon Wakefield
25 Jun 2015

Exploring Ancient Life Under the Shadow of Stonehenge

Our knowledge of the people who worshiped at Stonehenge and worked on its construction is set to be transformed through a new project led by the University of Reading.

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Nils Knötschke from Dinosaur Park Münchehagen, excavating the footprints in 2003. In order to keep the footprints from breaking while they were chiseled out of the rock, they were coated in plaster before removing them. Photo: Holger Lüdtke/2003
24 Jun 2015

Researchers Reconstruct Dinosaur Tracks

Twelve years ago, footprints of carnivorous dinosaurs were discovered and excavated in a quarry near Goslar.

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This is Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale (Royal Ontario Museum 61513). The fossil is 15 mm long. Credit : Jean-Bernard Caron
24 Jun 2015

Newly found ring of teeth uncovers what common ancestor of molting animals looked like

A new study of an otherworldly creature from half a billion years ago – a worm-like animal with legs, spikes and a head difficult to distinguish from its tail – has definitively identified its head for the first time, and revealed a previously unknown ring of teeth and a pair of simple eyes.

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This is a computer model and virtual development of the tooth plate of Romundina stellina, with colors gold through purple indicating the first up to the final tooth addition. Credit : Martin Rücklin, Naturalis Biodiversity Center
24 Jun 2015

Forgotten fossil indicates earlier origin of teeth

The tooth plate of just some millimeters in size had been in a box for more than 40 years, without being recognized after the discovery and preparation of the fish it belonged to.

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Credit : Erich Ferdinand
24 Jun 2015

Studies find early European had recent Neanderthal ancestor

In 2002, archaeologists discovered the jawbone of a human who lived in Europe about 40,000 years ago. Geneticists have now analyzed ancient DNA from that jawbone and learned that it belonged to a modern human whose recent ancestors included Neanderthals.

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burke1
24 Jun 2015

Kennewick Man: Solving a scientific controversy

An 8,500-year-old male skeleton discovered in 1996 in Columbia River in Washington State has been the focus of a bitter dispute between Native Americans and American scientists, and even within the American scientific community.

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Photo: Prof. Israel Hershkovitz, Tel Aviv University
24 Jun 2015

400,000-year-old dental tartar provides earliest evidence of manmade pollution

Most dentists recommend a proper teeth cleaning every six months to prevent, among other things, the implacable buildup of calculus or tartar — hardened dental plaque. Routine calculus buildup can only be removed through the use of ultrasonic tools or dental hand instruments. But what of 400,000-year-old dental tartar?

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stone1
24 Jun 2015

Stone tools from Jordan point to dawn of division of labor

Thousands of stone tools from the early Upper Paleolithic, unearthed from a cave in Jordan, reveal clues about how humans may have started organizing into more complex social groups by planning tasks and specializing in different technical skills.

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rabbit
09 Jun 2015

What rabbits can tell us about Neanderthal extinction?

When thinking about the extinction of Neanderthals some 30,000 years ago, rabbits may not be the first thing that spring to mind. But the way rabbits were hunted and eaten by Neanderthals and modern humans – or not, as the case may be – may offer vital clues as to why one species died out while the other flourished.

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