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Edinburgh Castle sits on cone of extinct volcano

March 12th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
Edinburgh Castle is a historic fortress which dominates the skyline of the city of Edinburgh,Scotland from its position on the Castle Rock.  The castle stands upon the plug of an extinct volcano, which is estimated to...
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Invention of the Seismoscope

January 4th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
In AD 132, Zhang Heng of China’s Han dynasty invented the first seismoscope (by the definition above), which was called Houfeng Didong Yi (literally, “instrument for measuring the seasonal winds and the...
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Santa Claus

December 7th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Saint Nicholas (Greek: Ἅγιος Νικόλαος, Hagios Nikólaos, Latin: Sanctus Nicolaus, Bulgarian: Св. Николай); (15 March 270 – 6 December 343), also called Nikolaos of Myra, was a...
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Basil the Bulgar Slayer

December 7th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Basil II (Greek: Βασίλειος Β΄, Basileios II; 958 – 15 December 1025) was a Byzantine Emperor from theMacedonian dynasty who reigned from 10 January 976 to 15 December 1025. He was known in his time as Basil...
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American Invasion of Britain – WAR PLAN RED

December 3rd, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Joint Army and Navy Basic War Plan Red was a war plan created by the United States Army and Navy in the late 1920s and early 1930s to estimate the requirements for a hypothetical war with Great Britain (the “Red”...
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Mammoths still walked the earth when the Great Pyramid was being built

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Wrangel Island is an island in the Arctic Ocean, between the Chukchi Sea and East Siberian Sea. Woolly mammoths survived there until 2500–2000 BC, the most recent survival of all known mammoth populations. Isolated from the...
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Earliest known usage of soap

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The earliest recorded evidence of the production of soap-like materials dates back to around 2800 BC in ancient Babylon. A formula for soap consisting of water, alkali, and cassia oil was written on a Babylonian clay tablet...
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Viking warriors were elite guard of Byzantine Empire

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The Varangians or Varyags (Old Norse: Væringjar; Greek: Βάραγγοι, Βαριάγοι, Varangoi,Variagoi) was the name given by Greeks and East Slavs to Vikings, who between the 9th and 11th centuries ruled the medieval...
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Nazi station in Canada

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Weather Station Kurt (Wetter-Funkgerät Land-26) was an automatic weather station, erected by aGerman U-boat crew in Northern Labrador, Newfoundland in October 1943. Installing the equipment for the station was the only known...
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Bouddica – Girl Power

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Boudica (d. AD 60 or 61) was queen of the British Iceni tribe, a Celtic tribe who led an uprising against the occupying forces of the Roman...
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The Aztecs were actually called Mexica

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The Mexica or Mexicas — called Aztecs in occidental historiography, although this term is not limited to the Mexica — were an indigenous people of the Valley of Mexico, known today as the rulers of the Aztec...
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Sacred Band of Thebes, Elite Gay Soldiers

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The Sacred Band of Thebes (Ancient Greek: Ἱερὸς Λόχος, Hieròs Lókhos) was a troop of picked soldiers, consisting of 150 pairs of male lovers which formed the elite force of the Theban army in the 4th century...
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Antonine Wall

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The Antonine Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Romans across what is now the Central Belt of Scotland, between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde. Representing the northernmost frontier barrier of the...
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Earliest use of toilet paper

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Although paper had been known as a wrapping and padding material in China since the 2nd century BC, the first documented use of toilet paper in human history dates back to the 6th century AD, in early medieval China. In 589 AD...
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Lost temple of Isis in London

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The evidence for a temple to the eastern goddess Isis is indicated by graffito on a 1st-century flagon found in Tooley Street, Southwark which reads LONDINI AD FANVM ISIDIS, or ‘To London at the temple of...
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Cheesemaking from 8000 BCE

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Cheese is an ancient food whose origins predate recorded history. There is no conclusive evidence indicating where cheesemaking originated, either in Europe, Central Asia or the Middle East, but the practice had spread within...
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El Gigante, the giant Moais of Easter Island

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Besides its remoteness, Easter Island is, of course, famous for its massive stone sculptures or "Moais." The largest of these is "El Gigante," located near the Rano Raraku Quarry, which stands some 72 feet tall (well, 71.93 to be...
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Ancient antibiotics in beer

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The ancient Nubians consumed large quantities of antibiotics that were produced in their beer almost 1,500 years ago, new research...
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Stonehenge make-over

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Over the past 100 years, Stonehenge has gone through a series of restoration work and make-overs....
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Where “Thugs” got its name

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Thuggee or tuggee refers to the acts of thugs, an organized gang of professional...
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Roman Sex Tokens

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
A spintria (plural, spintriae) is a small bronze or brass Roman token, possibly for use in brothels, usually depicting sexual acts or...
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Last Nazi operation in WW2

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Operation Haudegen was the name of a German operation during the Second World War to establish meteorological stations on...
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Nazi sun gun death ray

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
In 1929, the German physicist Hermann Oberth developed plans for a space station from which a 100 metre-wide concave mirror could be used to reflect sunlight onto a concentrated point on the...
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Punishment for adultery in ancient Athens

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Rhaphanidosis is the act of inserting the root of a plant of the raphanus genus (commonly known as a radish) into the anus. It is reported to have been a punishment for adultery in ancient Athens of the 5th and 4th centuries...
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Alþingi Viking Parliament

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The Alþingi (anglicised as Althing or Althingi) is the national parliament (literally: " all-thing", or general assembly) of Iceland. It is one of the oldest extant parliamentary institutions in the world....
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The unfinished obelisk

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The unfinished obelisk is the largest known ancient obelisk and is located in the northern region of the stone quarries of ancient Egypt in Aswan...
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Ice aircraft carriers during WW2

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Project Habakkuk or Habbakuk (spelling varies; see below) was a plan by the British in World War II to construct an aircraft carrier out of pykrete (a mixture of wood pulp and ice), for use against German U-boats in the...
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Earliest usage of glue adhesives

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
The earliest use of adhesives was discovered in Italy. At this site, two stone flakes partially covered with birch-bark-tar and a third uncovered stone from the Middle Pleistocene era (circa 200,000 years ago) were found. This is...
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Bubonic plague fleas bombed on China by Imperial Japanese Army

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Plague was used during the Second Sino-Japanese War as a bacteriological weapon by the Imperial Japanese Army. These weapons were provided by Shirō Ishii's units and used in experiments on humans before being used on the...
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Antikythera mechanism, the first analogue computer

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
This machine has the oldest known complex gear mechanism and is sometimes called the first known analog computer, although the quality of its manufacture suggests that it may have had undiscovered predecessors during the...
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Ancient Greeks carved out “CATCH” in projectiles

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Ancient Greek lead sling bullets with a winged thunderbolt engraved on one side and the inscription "ΔΕΞΑΙ" (Dexai) meaning "take that" or "catch" on the other side, 4th century BC, from Athens, British...
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Roman coins discovered in Iceland

November 28th, 2013 | by heritagedaily
Ancient Roman coins dating to the 3rd century have been found in Iceland, but it is unknown whether they were brought there at that time or came later with Viking settlers, having circulated as currency already for centuries....