breaking news

Citizen scientists saving lives around deadly ‘Throat of Fire’ volcano
Natural World
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Citizen scientists saving lives around deadly ‘Throat of Fire’ volcano

August 22nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Citizen scientists are saving lives of people living in the shadow of deadly volcanoes according to new research from the University of East Anglia....
Jurassic Welsh mammals were picky eaters, study finds
Palaeontology
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Jurassic Welsh mammals were picky eaters, study finds

August 20th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
For most people, mere mention of the word Jurassic conjures up images of huge dinosaurs chomping their way through lush vegetation – and each other. However, mammals and their immediate ancestors were also around in the...
Pre-Columbian Mycobacterial Genomes Reveal Seals as a Source of New World Human Tuberculosis
Natural World
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Pre-Columbian Mycobacterial Genomes Reveal Seals as a Source of New World Human Tuberculosis

August 20th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
Tuberculosis is one of the most persistent and deadliest infectious diseases in the world, killing one to two million people each...
Paleolithic diet of snails 10,000 years earlier than previously thought
Archaeology
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Paleolithic diet of snails 10,000 years earlier than previously thought

August 20th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
Paleolithic inhabitants of modern-day Spain may have eaten snails 10,000 years earlier than their Mediterranean neighbors, according to a study published August 20, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE....
Rome’s first emperor died 2000 years ago – his tomb is now used as a toilet
Archaeology
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Rome’s first emperor died 2000 years ago – his tomb is now used as a toilet

August 20th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
Augustus, who died 2000 years ago, was the first emperor of Rome. He brought peace after the turmoil in the republic after the assassination of Julius Caesar when he defeated the forces of Antony and Cleopatra....
Evolution of marine crocodilians constrained by ocean temperatures
Palaeontology
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Evolution of marine crocodilians constrained by ocean temperatures

August 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The ancestors of today’s crocodiles colonized the seas during warm phases and became extinct during cold phases, according to a new Anglo-French study, which establishes the link between marine crocodilian diversity and the...
£1.5 million aid for historic buildings
Heritage
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£1.5 million aid for historic buildings

August 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
More than £1.5 million has been awarded to help repair seven historic buildings across Scotland as part of Historic Scotland’s Building Repairs Grants...
500 million year reset for the immune system
Natural World
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500 million year reset for the immune system

August 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A single factor has the potential to reset the immune system of mice to a state similar to what it was 500 million years ago, a time when the first vertebrates...
Toothless ‘dragon’ pterosaurs dominated the Late Cretaceous skies
Palaeontology
1

Toothless ‘dragon’ pterosaurs dominated the Late Cretaceous skies

August 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new study provides an exciting insight into the Late Cretaceous and the diversity and distribution of the toothless ‘dragon’ pterosaurs from the Azhdarchidae family. The research was published in the open access journal...
New home for an ‘evolutionary misfit’
Palaeontology
1

New home for an ‘evolutionary misfit’

August 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A worm-like creature with legs and spikes finally finds its place in the evolutionary tree of...
Bone Chemistry reveals royal lifestyle of Richard III
Archaeology
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Bone Chemistry reveals royal lifestyle of Richard III

August 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new study conducted by the British Geological Survey, in association with researchers at the University of Leicester, has explored the bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III and unveiled fascinating new details about the...
Luas Works Reveal Multiple Human Remains at College Green
Archaeology
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Luas Works Reveal Multiple Human Remains at College Green

August 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The archaeological team located an individual at a depth of 1.5m below the present ground surface, immediately north of the gates of Trinity College, Dublin. The individual was situated below the known level of post-medieval...
The Mummy’s Face: Solving an Ancient Mystery
Archaeology
1

The Mummy’s Face: Solving an Ancient Mystery

August 14th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
He looks almost Byzantine or Greek, gazing doe-eyed over the viewer’s left shoulder, his mouth forming a slight pout, like a star-struck lover or perhaps a fan of the races witnessing his favorite charioteer losing control of...
Embalming study ‘rewrites’ key chapter in Egyptian history
Archaeology
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Embalming study ‘rewrites’ key chapter in Egyptian history

August 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie and Oxford have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought. The scientific...
Mind-Blowing Giant Crystals — What Can They Teach Us?
Natural World
3

Mind-Blowing Giant Crystals — What Can They Teach Us?

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Giant gypsum crystals -- some of which are in excess of 30 feet long and half a million years old -- are found deep within the Naica mine in Chihuahua, Mexico and are renowned for their spectacular beauty....
Climate change and drought in ancient times
Geology
1

Climate change and drought in ancient times

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The influence of climate on agriculture is believed to be a key factor in the rise and fall of societies in the Ancient Near East. Dr. Simone Riehl of Tübingen University’s Institute for Archaeological Science and the...
Space-age technologies aim to uncover Britain’s heritage
Archaeology
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Space-age technologies aim to uncover Britain’s heritage

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A team from the University of Leicester is to investigate the potential use of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) technology to advance understanding of our...
Reconstructions show how some of the earliest animals lived…and died
Natural World
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Reconstructions show how some of the earliest animals lived…and died

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New three-dimensional reconstructions display how some of the world’s earliest animals developed, and offer some answers as to why they went...
Western Wall Wearing Away? Discovery of Extreme Erosion Process Could Guide New Preservation Techniques
Geology
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Western Wall Wearing Away? Discovery of Extreme Erosion Process Could Guide New Preservation Techniques

August 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem investigated erosion in the different types of limestone in the Western Wall located at the foot of Jerusalem’s Temple Mount. Stones comprised of large crystals were almost...
Ancient shellfish remains rewrite 10,000-year history of El Niño cycles
Archaeology
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Ancient shellfish remains rewrite 10,000-year history of El Niño cycles

August 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The planet’s largest and most powerful driver of climate changes from one year to the next, the El Niño Southern Oscillation in the tropical Pacific Ocean, was believed to have been weaker in ancient times due to the different...
Excavation of ancient well yields insight into Etruscan, Roman and medieval times
Archaeology
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Excavation of ancient well yields insight into Etruscan, Roman and medieval times

August 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
During a four-year-long excavation of an Etruscan well at the ancient Italian settlement of Cetamura del Chianti, a team led by a Florida State University archaeologist and art historian unveiled a wealth of artifacts spanning...
Top 10 deadliest volcanic eruptions
Fun and Interesting
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Top 10 deadliest volcanic eruptions

August 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Volcanoes are among the most devastating and dangerous natural forces in our past, but it is not just throughout history that they wrecked havoc on human life but right up to the 21st century. Their volatility and unreliability...
10 must see historic walls
Fun and Interesting
2

10 must see historic walls

August 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The world has seen many wars and conflicts throughout history, which has given us a multitude of ancient defensive structures, like fortified walls, to see and explore. Here listed are just some of the many historic walls that...
10 Historical Houses
Fun and Interesting
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10 Historical Houses

August 6th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The world is full of fascinating historic houses that are begging to be explored. By visiting them you can obtain a wealth of information about the people who once lived there and what shaped their lives. From the haunted...
Scientists to explore how insects evolved ultrasonic hearing abilities over millennia
Natural World
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Scientists to explore how insects evolved ultrasonic hearing abilities over millennia

August 6th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Leverhulme Trust has awarded a grant of £250,000 to a team of scientists led by the University of Lincoln, UK, to research how a group of insects evolved incredible ultrasonic hearing...
Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not a new ‘hobbit’ human
Anthropology
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Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not a new ‘hobbit’ human

August 5th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In October 2004, the excavation of the fragmentary skeletal remains from the island of Flores, located in Indonesia, yielded what was deemed “the most important find in human evolution for 100 years.” The exciting discoveries...
WSU researchers see violent era in ancient southwest
Archaeology
3

WSU researchers see violent era in ancient southwest

August 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
It’s a given, in terms of numbers, the 20th Century was the most violent in history, with the American Civil War, purges and the two World Wars killing as many as 200 million...
Society bloomed with gentler personalities and more feminine faces
Anthropology
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Society bloomed with gentler personalities and more feminine faces

August 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Technology boom 50,000 years ago is associated with apparent reduction in...
Shrinking dinosaurs evolved into flying birds
Palaeontology
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Shrinking dinosaurs evolved into flying birds

August 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A novel study lead by Adelaide scientist has shown how enormous, carnivorous, ground-dwelling dinosaurs – the theropods – evolved into agile flyers: they kept shrinking in size for over 50 million...
The ignored women of World War I
Heritage
1

The ignored women of World War I

August 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A study has awoken a silenced part of the First World War: the role of the war’s women. Researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Castilla-La Mancha consulted specialised sources on the women...
Queen of the Desert tapestries
Heritage
1

Queen of the Desert tapestries

July 31st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
She was a trailblazer, a spy, diplomat and archaeologist from the North East who travelled extensively across her beloved Arabia and helped to create a...
Decades-old amber collection offers news views of a lost world
Geology
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Decades-old amber collection offers news views of a lost world

July 31st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Scientists are searching through an extremely large collection of 20-million-year-old amber unearthed in the Dominican Republic over 50 years ago; the effort is displaying new insights into ancient tropical insects and the world...
How the lion got his head back
Archaeology
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How the lion got his head back

July 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Archaeologists from the University of Tübingen have discovered an ancient fragment of ivory, which belonged to a 40,000-year-old animal figurine. Both pieces were discovered in the Vogelherd cave located in the south west of...
Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes
Archaeology
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Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes

July 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Finland’s love for milk has been traced as far back as 2500 BC thanks to high-tech techniques to analyse residues preserved in fragments of ancient...
Unique Images bring fossil insects back to life
Palaeontology
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Unique Images bring fossil insects back to life

July 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A ground breaking new book brings together two of the major disciplines behind the popular film franchise Jurassic Park, with the aim to raise the profile of insect fossils through stunning photographs and unique...
DNA Find Reveals New Insights into the History of Cattle in Europe
Archaeology
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DNA Find Reveals New Insights into the History of Cattle in Europe

July 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A research team from the University of Basel uncovered some interesting findings in a Neolithic settlement at the boarders of Lake Biel in Switzerland: The DNA of a cattle bone displays genetic traces of the European aurochs and...
Dinosaurs fell victim to perfect storm of events, study shows
Palaeontology
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Dinosaurs fell victim to perfect storm of events, study shows

July 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Scientists say that the dinosaurs may have survived the fatal asteroid strike if it had taken place slightly earlier or later in...
Earlier Stone Age artefacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa
Archaeology
1

Earlier Stone Age artefacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa

July 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South America have provided tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artefacts, including items such as hand axes. These artefacts were unearthed by...
3-D image of Palaeolithic child’s skull reveals trauma, brain damage
Archaeology
1

3-D image of Palaeolithic child’s skull reveals trauma, brain damage

July 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
3-D imaging provides researchers with brand new insights into Palaeolithic child’s skull...
SEKHEMKA IS LIKE GOLLUM’S “PRECIOUS” SAY CRITICS AS CHRISTIE’S CONFIRM SALE OF STATUE TO PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Heritage
2

SEKHEMKA IS LIKE GOLLUM’S “PRECIOUS” SAY CRITICS AS CHRISTIE’S CONFIRM SALE OF STATUE TO PRIVATE COLLECTOR

July 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Auctioneer Christie's, which sold the unique statue of the Egyptian Scribe Sekhemka for the World Record Price of £15.76 million, on 10 July, today confirmed that the buyer of the statue, which had been on public display for...