breaking news

Roman-Britons had less gum disease than modern Britons
Archaeology
1

Roman-Britons had less gum disease than modern Britons

October 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Roman-British population from c.200-400 AD seems to have had much less gum disease the what we experience today, according to a new study of skulls at the Natural History Museum led by a King’s College London periodontist....
Genomic data support early contact between Easter Island and Americas
Archaeology
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Genomic data support early contact between Easter Island and Americas

October 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
It is possible people may have been making the trip from Easter Island to the Americas a long time before the Dutch commander Jakob Roggeveen arrived with his ships in 1722, according to new genomic evidence demonstrating that...
Kung Fu Stegosaur
Palaeontology
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Kung Fu Stegosaur

October 22nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Stegosaurs have in the past been presented to us as lumbering plant eaters, but in reality they were lethal fighters when necessary, according to palaeontologists who have unveiled new evidence of a casualty of stegosaurian...
NOAA team discovers two vessels from WWII convey battle off North Carolina
Archaeology
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NOAA team discovers two vessels from WWII convey battle off North Carolina

October 22nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
German U-boat 576 and freighter Bluefields discovered within 240 yards of each...
Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture
Archaeology
0

Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

October 22nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Through the analysis of DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years...
Secrets of Dinosaur Ecology discovered in fragile amber
Geology
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Secrets of Dinosaur Ecology discovered in fragile amber

October 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The research conducted by Ryan McKellar’s sounds like it could of come straight out of Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. However, instead of re-creating dinosaurs, McKellar uses the...
Anthropology Unveils clues about Roman gladiators’ eating habits
Anthropology
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Anthropology Unveils clues about Roman gladiators’ eating habits

October 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
It has been found that Roman gladiators consumed a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors discovered during...
Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis
Archaeology
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Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis

October 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Egyptian mummies show no signs of disabling...
Journey to the centre of the earth
Geology
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Journey to the centre of the earth

October 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
UCSB geochemist uses helium and lead isotopes to obtain a better understanding of the makeup of the planet’s deep...
Scientists find ancient mountains that fed early life
Geology
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Scientists find ancient mountains that fed early life

October 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Scientists have uncovered evidence for a huge mountain range that sustained an explosion of life on Earth 600 million years...
Microfossils reveal warm oceans had less oxygen, according to Syracuse geologists
Geology
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Microfossils reveal warm oceans had less oxygen, according to Syracuse geologists

October 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Professor Zunli Lu uses geochemistry and micropalaeontology to track oxygen levels in global...
Extinct giant kangaroos may have been hop-less
Palaeontology
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Extinct giant kangaroos may have been hop-less

October 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Stiff backs and strong joints show that giant kangaroos may have walked instead of...
Archaeological glass artefacts shed new light on Swedish glass history
Archaeology
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Archaeological glass artefacts shed new light on Swedish glass history

October 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Archaeological finds of glass material from Old Lödöse, a Swedish trade centre in the High Middle Ages, call for a revision of the country’s glass history. This is the conclusion of a doctoral thesis in archaeology from the...
Ancient fossils confirmed among our strangest cousins
Palaeontology
0

Ancient fossils confirmed among our strangest cousins

October 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Over 100 years has passed since their discovery, yet some of the world’s most bizarre fossils have just been identified as distant relatives of humans, thanks to the work of University of Adelaide...
New ‘tree of life’ traces evolution of a mysterious cotinga birds
Natural World
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New ‘tree of life’ traces evolution of a mysterious cotinga birds

October 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
They are known as some of the brightest, loudest, most unusual looking, and least understood birds that glide across our skies. Some have bulbous crests, long fleshy wattles, or Elvis-worthy pompadours, along with electric blue,...
University of Leicester archaeologists uncover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot
Archaeology News
2

University of Leicester archaeologists uncover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot

October 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A team has unveiled a matching set of decorated bronze parts from a 2nd or 3rd century BC Celtic chariot at Burrough Hill Iron Age...
Fossilised bird egg offers clues to Brazil’s prehistoric past
Palaeontology
0

Fossilised bird egg offers clues to Brazil’s prehistoric past

October 14th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Brazilian scientists have uncovered a near-intact fossilised bird egg- Brazil’s first- in Sao Paulo...
Swiss Scientists Explain Evolution of Extreme Parasites
Natural World
0

Swiss Scientists Explain Evolution of Extreme Parasites

October 14th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Extreme adaptations of species usually cause such considerable changes that their evolutionary history is difficult to recreate. Zoologists at the University of Basel in Switzerland have now uncovered a new parasite species that...
How technology, not spades, revealed what lies beneath Stonehenge
Archaeology
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How technology, not spades, revealed what lies beneath Stonehenge

October 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The recent discoveries at Stonehenge, including ritual monuments, burial mounds and a long barrow, are wonderful examples of how archaeological geophysics can be used in areas where excavation is hard to...
Physics determined ammonite shell shape
Palaeontology
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Physics determined ammonite shell shape

October 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Ammonites are a group of extinct cephalopod mollusks with ribbed spiral shells. They are unusually diverse and well known among fossil lovers. Régis Chirat, researcher at the Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon: Terre, Planètes et...
Bespoke toilet seat company pledges funds towards preservation of ancient loo seat.
Archaeology
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Bespoke toilet seat company pledges funds towards preservation of ancient loo seat.

October 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
As world-wide interest in the discovery of an ancient toilet seat in Northumberland continues a bespoke toilet seat manufacturer Tosca & Willoughby based in Oxfordshire have stepped forward and pledged a cash sum towards its...
Greek Bronze Age ended 100 years earlier than thought, new evidence suggests
Archaeology
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Greek Bronze Age ended 100 years earlier than thought, new evidence suggests

October 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Conventional estimates for the collapse of the Aegean civilization may be incorrect by up to a century, according to new radiocarbon...
Spectacular finds from ancient greek shipwreck: New Antihythera discoveries prove luxury cargo survives
Archaeology
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Spectacular finds from ancient greek shipwreck: New Antihythera discoveries prove luxury cargo survives

October 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A team of Greek and international divers and archaeologists have retrieved stunning new discoveries from an ancient Greek ship that sank over 2,000 years ago off the remote island of Antikythera. The rescued antiquities include...
New Online Encyclopaedia Devoted to World War I is Now Accessible
Heritage
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New Online Encyclopaedia Devoted to World War I is Now Accessible

October 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new encyclopaedia includes contributions from 1,000 experts from 54...
Bronze Age Palace and Grave Goods Discovered at the Archaeological Site of La Almoloya in Pliego, Murcia
Archaeology
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Bronze Age Palace and Grave Goods Discovered at the Archaeological Site of La Almoloya in Pliego, Murcia

October 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
An excavation carried out in August by the researchers of Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona’s (UAB) Department of Prehistory Vicente Lull, Cristina Huete, Rafael Micó y Roberto Risch have made evident the unique...
Treasure trove of ancient genomes helps recalibrate the human evolutionary clock
Archaeology
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Treasure trove of ancient genomes helps recalibrate the human evolutionary clock

October 8th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Just as if you were adjusting a watch, the key to accurately telling evolutionary time is based on periodically calibrating against a gold...
Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox
Natural World
0

Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox

October 8th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Imagine trying to trace your genetic history using sources from just your mother’s side. That’s exactly what scientists studying the evolution of the red fox have been doing for decades. However, now, University of...
Historic WW2 Defences uncovered on the Suffolk Coast
Archaeology
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Historic WW2 Defences uncovered on the Suffolk Coast

October 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Touching the Tide, a £900,000 project funded by the Heritage Lottery and The Crown Estate, through its Marine Stewardship Programme, is working with the Suffolk County Council Archaeological Service to explore the remains of...
How geography affects animal evolution
Natural World
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How geography affects animal evolution

October 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new and potentially more revealing way of studying how animal evolution is affected by the geography of climate has been designed by researchers at The University of Nottingham and Harvard...
Tracing our ancestors at the bottom of the sea
Archaeology
1

Tracing our ancestors at the bottom of the sea

October 6th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New European Marine Board report recommends exploration of sea-submerged settlements abandoned by our ancestors....
52-million-year-old amber preserves ‘ant-loving’ beetle
Palaeontology
0

52-million-year-old amber preserves ‘ant-loving’ beetle

October 3rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Eocene fossil is oldest-known social parasite of ants, correlates with the ecological rise of modern...
On invasive species, it turns out Darwin was right all along, study shows
Natural World
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On invasive species, it turns out Darwin was right all along, study shows

October 2nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Dov Sax of Brown University and Jason Fridley from Syracuse University aren’t offering a new idea to explain species invasiveness. In fact, Charles Darwin suggested it first. What’s new about Sax and Fridley’s...
UNCOVERING YEMEN
Archaeology News
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UNCOVERING YEMEN

October 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
2500 years ago, frankincense and myrhh burned throughout the kingdoms of Southern Arabia. 50 years ago, Wendell Phillips unearthed the sand-covered ruins along the ancient incense trading...
SEEMPUBS: maximum energy savings with minimum interventions for historic buildings
Heritage
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SEEMPUBS: maximum energy savings with minimum interventions for historic buildings

October 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Europe’s historic buildings attract visitors from across the world. However, keeping the popular historic sites energy-efficient without significant construction works can be somewhat of a challenge. The EU-funded project...
Council blind spot over hillfort housing jeopardises county plan, warn campaigners
Heritage
1

Council blind spot over hillfort housing jeopardises county plan, warn campaigners

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Shropshire Council is gambling with public money and elector confidence by keeping housing allocations by Old Oswestry hillfort in its development masterplan, say...
Hyperspectral imaging shines light on the early Finns’ life in the Stone Age
Archaeology News
0

Hyperspectral imaging shines light on the early Finns’ life in the Stone Age

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The 5,500 years old clay figurines found at community excavations in Vantaa, Finland in summer 2014, were recently scanned with SPECIM’s hyperspectral camera....
Science & Activism in the 21st Century : The Archaeoventurers Project
Archaeology News
0

Science & Activism in the 21st Century : The Archaeoventurers Project

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The ArchaeoVenturers Project flips the script on traditional archaeology. ArchaeoVenturers Katie Paul (‘The Digger’) and Justine Benanty (‘The Diver’) explore the challenges facing our history today and the people who are...
Greenland Ice Sheet more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought
Natural World
1

Greenland Ice Sheet more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A brand new model developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge has indicated that despite its apparent stability, the vast ice sheet covering most of Greenland is more sensitive to climate change than earlier...
Tooth serves as evidence of 220 million-year-old attack
Palaeontology
1

Tooth serves as evidence of 220 million-year-old attack

September 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A tooth challenges beliefs about how ancient reptiles...
Ancient Human Genome from Southern Africa throws light on our origins
Anthropology
0

Ancient Human Genome from Southern Africa throws light on our origins

September 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The skeleton of a man who walked the earth 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tells us about ourselves as humans, and sheds some crucial light on our earliest common genetic...