breaking news

Unique Images bring fossil insects back to life
Palaeontology
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Unique Images bring fossil insects back to life

July 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A ground breaking new book brings together two of the major disciplines behind the popular film franchise Jurassic Park, with the aim to raise the profile of insect fossils through stunning photographs and unique...
DNA Find Reveals New Insights into the History of Cattle in Europe
Archaeology
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DNA Find Reveals New Insights into the History of Cattle in Europe

July 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A research team from the University of Basel uncovered some interesting findings in a Neolithic settlement at the boarders of Lake Biel in Switzerland: The DNA of a cattle bone displays genetic traces of the European aurochs and...
Dinosaurs fell victim to perfect storm of events, study shows
Palaeontology
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Dinosaurs fell victim to perfect storm of events, study shows

July 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Scientists say that the dinosaurs may have survived the fatal asteroid strike if it had taken place slightly earlier or later in...
Earlier Stone Age artefacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa
Archaeology
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Earlier Stone Age artefacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa

July 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South America have provided tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artefacts, including items such as hand axes. These artefacts were unearthed by...
3-D image of Palaeolithic child’s skull reveals trauma, brain damage
Archaeology
1

3-D image of Palaeolithic child’s skull reveals trauma, brain damage

July 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
3-D imaging provides researchers with brand new insights into Palaeolithic child’s skull...
SEKHEMKA IS LIKE GOLLUM’S “PRECIOUS” SAY CRITICS AS CHRISTIE’S CONFIRM SALE OF STATUE TO PRIVATE COLLECTOR
Heritage
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SEKHEMKA IS LIKE GOLLUM’S “PRECIOUS” SAY CRITICS AS CHRISTIE’S CONFIRM SALE OF STATUE TO PRIVATE COLLECTOR

July 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Auctioneer Christie's, which sold the unique statue of the Egyptian Scribe Sekhemka for the World Record Price of £15.76 million, on 10 July, today confirmed that the buyer of the statue, which had been on public display for...
Ancient genetic material from caries bacterium obtained for the first time
Anthropology
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Ancient genetic material from caries bacterium obtained for the first time

July 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Streptococcus mutans, a principle bacterium that causes dental caries, has increased the change in its genetic material over time, possibly coinciding with dietary changes that are linked with the expansion of...
Jeju Island is a live volcano
Geology
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Jeju Island is a live volcano

July 22nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In Jeju, renowned as an attractive holiday destination with natural tourism resources, a recent study unveiled a volcanic eruption occurred on the island. The Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) discovered...
Mammoth and Mastodon Behavior was less roam, more stay at home
Palaeontology
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Mammoth and Mastodon Behavior was less roam, more stay at home

July 22nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
According to research conducted by the University of Cincinnati, the fuzzy relatives of modern-day elephants liked living in Greater Cincinnati long before it became the trendy hot spot it is today- at the end of the last ice...
Science and art bring back to life 300 million-year-old specimens of a primitive reptile-like vertebrate
Palaeontology
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Science and art bring back to life 300 million-year-old specimens of a primitive reptile-like vertebrate

July 22nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Palaeontologists from the Natural History Museum and academics from Lincoln, Cambridge and Slovakia have managed to recreate the cranial structure of a 308-million-year-old lizard-like vertebrate that could potentially be the...
The economic territory of Upper Palaeolithic Groups is specified by flint
Archaeology
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The economic territory of Upper Palaeolithic Groups is specified by flint

July 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Research conducted by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has determined, on the basis of the Ametzagaina site, the mobility patterns and management of lithic resources....
10 must see roman sites across the world
Fun and Interesting
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10 must see roman sites across the world

July 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Roman era is one of the most well known among today’s civilization, it is an era of history that is taught at the majority of schools and was so widespread that you can visit many different parts of the world and still...
Marmoset sequence unveils new information on primate biology and evolution
Anthropology
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Marmoset sequence unveils new information on primate biology and evolution

July 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A group of scientists from around the globe led by the Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset- the first sequence of a New World Monkey-...
London’s Viking Lineage
Featured Articles
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London’s Viking Lineage

July 18th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
London is generally associated with the Romans, Saxons and Normans, but a lesser known part of London’s history is intertwined with that of the...
10 World War I sites to remember
Fun and Interesting
1

10 World War I sites to remember

July 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
As we mark the 100-year anniversary of what was deemed ‘The Great War’ it is time to explore the vast array of historical sites that the conflict left behind in various locations, including France and Britain. These include...
Ruination, Regeneration and Re-use: The Lister Drive Carnegie Library
Heritage
3

Ruination, Regeneration and Re-use: The Lister Drive Carnegie Library

July 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Lister Steps, a childcare charity in Liverpool, have secured initial support from the Heritage Lottery Fund to regenerate the Grade II listed former West Derby Carnegie Library on Lister Drive in Tuebrook,...
Tooth plaque provides unique insights into our prehistoric ancestors’ diet
Anthropology
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Tooth plaque provides unique insights into our prehistoric ancestors’ diet

July 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
An international team of researchers has discovered new evidence that our prehistoric ancestors had a detailed understanding of plants long before the development of...
Walking on all fours is not backward evolution, study shows
Anthropology
0

Walking on all fours is not backward evolution, study shows

July 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Anthropology study shows quadrupedal humans are not products of...
New view of Rainier’s volcanic plumbing
Geology
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New view of Rainier’s volcanic plumbing

July 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Electrical images show flows of fluids to magma...
Dodos and spotted green pigeons are descendants of an island hopping bird
Natural World
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Dodos and spotted green pigeons are descendants of an island hopping bird

July 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
According to scientists, the mysterious spotted green pigeon (Caloenas maculata) was a relative of the dodo. Scientists have examined the spotted green pigeon’s genetic make up and their findings have been published in the open...
New Feathered Predatory Fossil unearths new information on dinosaur flight
Palaeontology
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New Feathered Predatory Fossil unearths new information on dinosaur flight

July 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Discovered in China, “Four-Winged” fossil helps explain how larger dinosaurs took to the...
Meet the gomphothere: UA archaeologist involved in discovery of bones of elephant ancestor
Palaeontology
0

Meet the gomphothere: UA archaeologist involved in discovery of bones of elephant ancestor

July 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
An animal once thought to have disappeared from North America before the arrival of humans might have actually roamed the continent longer than previously thought-and it was likely on the list of prey for early humans,...
10 must see sites along Hadrian’s Wall
Fun and Interesting
1

10 must see sites along Hadrian’s Wall

July 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Hadrian’s Wall is the most famous tourist attraction in the whole Northern England and has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage...
Little too late: Researchers identify disease that may have plagued 700 year-old-skeleton
Archaeology
1

Little too late: Researchers identify disease that may have plagued 700 year-old-skeleton

July 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
European researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old-skeleton discovered in the ruins of a Medieval Italian...
Prehistoric ‘bookkeeping’ continued long after invention of writing
Archaeology
0

Prehistoric ‘bookkeeping’ continued long after invention of writing

July 14th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
An archaeological dig in the southeast of Turkey has unveiled a considerable number of clay tokens that were used as records of trade until the advent of writing, or so it was...
Visit Roman London
Fun and Interesting
0

Visit Roman London

July 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Londinium was a settlement established on the current site of the City of London around AD 50....
10 must see cave paintings
Fun and Interesting
0

10 must see cave paintings

July 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Magura Cave is located in the north west of Bulgaria and the paintings date back 8000-4000 years...
The curse of Sekjemka strikes Northampton as Alan Moore condemns £15 million sale of statue
Archaeology
2

The curse of Sekjemka strikes Northampton as Alan Moore condemns £15 million sale of statue

July 11th, 2014 | by Andy Brockman
As Christie's sell the statue of Sekhemka for £15.7 million, world famous graphic novelist Alan Moore torpedoes a key Government culture policy, the International Council of Museums condemns Northampton's sale of the statue and...
Sale of Sekhemka statue at Christie’s – ICOM CIPEG expresses concern
Heritage
1

Sale of Sekhemka statue at Christie’s – ICOM CIPEG expresses concern

July 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The International Council of Museums’ Committee for Egyptology (ICOM CIPEG) expresses concern about Northampton Borough Council’s selling of its Sekhemka statue at Christie’s...
Extinct Sea Scorpion gets Yale eye exam, with surprising results
Palaeontology
0

Extinct Sea Scorpion gets Yale eye exam, with surprising results

July 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Poor peepers are a problem, even if you are a big, bad sea scorpion....
One secret of ancient amber revealed
Geology
0

One secret of ancient amber revealed

July 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Amber is known as one of the most beautiful gemstones and its mysterious qualities were enough to inspire myths and legends many years ago, and the fossilized tree resin still manages to lock away secrets today....
Archaeologists have unearthed a bath house at Segedunum Roman Fort after years of speculation
Archaeology
0

Archaeologists have unearthed a bath house at Segedunum Roman Fort after years of speculation

July 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The mystery of a bath house buried underneath an ancient Roman fort has finally been discovered after years of speculation in a recent...
10 must see ancient greek temples
Fun and Interesting
1

10 must see ancient greek temples

July 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Back in Ancient Greece the temple was the most important building. The first temples to be constructed from stone began to appear in the 6th century. The Greek temples were not used as places of worship, but rather as monuments...
Egyptian Government threatens legal action to stop the sale of Sekhemka
Heritage
1

Egyptian Government threatens legal action to stop the sale of Sekhemka

July 8th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Egyptian Antiquities Minister, Mamdouh El-Damati, has asked the Egyptian Embassy, located in London, to take legal action to prevent the sale of the Sekhemka Statue currently residing in Northampton...
Discovery of Neandertal trait in ancient skull raises new questions about human evolution
Palaeoanthropology
0

Discovery of Neandertal trait in ancient skull raises new questions about human evolution

July 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Modern humans emerged from a complex 'labyrinth of biology and peoples,' findings...
World’s Earliest Erotic Graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean Island
Archaeology
0

World’s Earliest Erotic Graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean Island

July 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
World’s Earliest Erotic Graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean...
Cache of Roman and Corieltavi Iron Age coins discovered in cave
Archaeology
0

Cache of Roman and Corieltavi Iron Age coins discovered in cave

July 7th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
An excavation in Dovedale, Derbyshire by archaeologists from the National Trus, Leicester University and the Defence Archaeology Group (Operation Nightingale) has unearthed a hoard of Late Iron Age and Republican Roman coins, the...
New fossil find pinpoints the origin of jaws in vertebrates
Palaeontology
0

New fossil find pinpoints the origin of jaws in vertebrates

July 6th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
A major fossil discovery in Canada sheds new light on the development of the earliest vertebrates, including the origin of jaws, the first time this feature has been seen so early in the fossil...
Oldest biodiversity found in Gabonese marine ecosystem
Palaeontology
0

Oldest biodiversity found in Gabonese marine ecosystem

July 6th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
Researchers have discovered, in clay sediments from Gabon, fossils of the oldest multicellular organisms ever found. In total, more than 400 fossils dating back 2.1 billion years have been collected, including dozens of new...
Rewriting the history of volcanic forcing during the past 2,000 years
Geology
0

Rewriting the history of volcanic forcing during the past 2,000 years

July 6th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
A year-by-year record of volcanic eruptions from a comprehensive Antarctic ice core...