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Bronze Age dirk dagger used as doorstop saved with grant from the NHMF
Archaeology News
1

Bronze Age dirk dagger used as doorstop saved with grant from the NHMF

November 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A rare Middle Bronze Age weapon, one of only six known from Europe, has been saved for the nation with a grant of almost £39,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund...
Scientific methods shed new light on evolution of kinship patterns
Anthropology
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Scientific methods shed new light on evolution of kinship patterns

November 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New biological methods used to trace the evolutionary history of kinship patterns shed new light on how societies developed as farming spread across the globe during the Neolithic, according to new research by a UCL-led...
Evidence of domestic cereals in Sudan as early as 7,000 years ago
Archaeology News
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Evidence of domestic cereals in Sudan as early as 7,000 years ago

November 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Humans in Africa already exploited domestic cereals 7,000 years ago and thus several centuries earlier than previously...
Vultures evolved an extreme gut to cope with disgusting dietary habits
Natural World
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Vultures evolved an extreme gut to cope with disgusting dietary habits

November 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
How is it that vultures can live on a diet of carrion that would at least lead to severe food-poisoning, and more likely kill most other animals?...
Woolly Mammoth autopsy results revealed
Natural World
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Woolly Mammoth autopsy results revealed

November 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
This discovery of a mammoth with the best preserved flesh yet (three legs, most of the body, some of the head and even the trunk survived in extraordinary condition) has quickened the pace of one of the most ambitious and...
Flower links civil war, natural history and ‘The Blood Of Heroes’
Conflict
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Flower links civil war, natural history and ‘The Blood Of Heroes’

November 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
On August 14, 1864, in a Union Army camp in Georgia, a captain from Wisconsin plucked a plant, pressed it onto a sheet of paper, wrote a letter describing the plant as "certainly the most interesting specimen I ever saw," and...
Excavations of the Pafos Agora Project 2014
Archaeology News
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Excavations of the Pafos Agora Project 2014

November 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Department of Antiquities, Ministry of Communications and Works, announces the completion of the fourth season of excavations within the framework of the Pafos Agora Project, which aims to explore and study the Agora of the...
Oxford team shed light on Philae obelisk
Archaeology News
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Oxford team shed light on Philae obelisk

November 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
History was made this month as the robotic Philae lander completed the first controlled touchdown on a comet. The European Space Agency-led project was set up to obtain images of a comet’s surface and help scientists to...
Seed dormancy, a property that prevents germination, already existed 360 million years ago
Natural World
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Seed dormancy, a property that prevents germination, already existed 360 million years ago

November 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
An international team of scientists, coordinated by a researcher from the U. of Granada, has found that seed dormancy (a property that prevents germination under non-favourable conditions) was a feature already present in the...
New volume documents the science at the legendary snowmastodon fossil site in Colorado
Palaeontology
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New volume documents the science at the legendary snowmastodon fossil site in Colorado

November 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Four years ago, a bulldozer operator turned over some bones during construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado....
Tübingen biogeologists show how Gravettian people shared their food 30,000 years ago
Archaeology News
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Tübingen biogeologists show how Gravettian people shared their food 30,000 years ago

November 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Předmostí I is an exceptional prehistoric site located near Brno in the Czech Republic. Around 30,000 years ago it was inhabited by people of the pan-European Gravettian culture, who used the bones of more than 1000 mammoths to...
Biopolitics for understanding social regulation and control through archaeology
Archaeology News
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Biopolitics for understanding social regulation and control through archaeology

November 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Biopolitics for understanding social regulation and control. This constitutes part of the social policy that the Roman government put into practice during its expansion throughout the Mediterranean, which left its mark on the...
Recreating clothes from the Iron Age
Heritage
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Recreating clothes from the Iron Age

November 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A few years ago, the oldest known piece of clothing ever discovered in Norway, a tunic dating from the Iron Age, was found on a glacier in Breheimen. Now about to be reconstructed using Iron Age textile techniques, it is hoped...
10 bizarre war machines from World War Two
Conflict
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10 bizarre war machines from World War Two

November 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Second World War witnessed a leap in technology and weaponry. But there are some bizarre weapons that never quite made it into the wider public...
Caltech geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet
Geology
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Caltech geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet

November 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A team of researchers from Caltech and the China Earthquake Administration has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet, north of the eastern end of the Himalayas....
Archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at the ancient Egyptian site of Deir el-Medina
Archaeology News
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Archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at the ancient Egyptian site of Deir el-Medina

November 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
By combining an analysis of written artifacts with a study of skeletal remains, Stanford postdoctoral scholar Anne Austin is creating a detailed picture of care and medicine in the ancient...
Archaeologists race against time to explore Neanderthal site
Archaeology News
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Archaeologists race against time to explore Neanderthal site

November 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
University of Southampton archaeologists are working to save important Palaeolithic remains at a rare Neanderthal site, before they are lost to the forces of...
THE – The Heritage Explorer (Magazine) Crowdfunder
Archaeology News
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THE – The Heritage Explorer (Magazine) Crowdfunder

November 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Support us in launching a printed magazine that explores the history, archaeology, travel, culture and exploration of the...
Prehistoric farming on the ‘roof of the world’
Archaeology News
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Prehistoric farming on the ‘roof of the world’

November 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Animal teeth, bones and plant remains have helped researchers from Cambridge, China and America to pinpoint a date for what could be the earliest sustained human habitation at high...
Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain
Archaeology News
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Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain

November 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Las Médulas in León is considered to be the largest opencast goldmine of the Roman Empire, but the search for this metal extended many kilometres further south-east to the Erica river valley....
Anthropologist uncovers issues of gender inequality in archaeology journals
Archaeology News
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Anthropologist uncovers issues of gender inequality in archaeology journals

November 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
On an archaeology field trip in New Mexico as an undergraduate in 2006, Dana Bardolph noticed something that struck her as an odd gender imbalance: The professor leading the dig was a men, while the graduate assistant and all but...
Dating of Viking fortress could suggest it belonged to Harald Bluetooth
Archaeology News
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Dating of Viking fortress could suggest it belonged to Harald Bluetooth

November 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In September 2014, archaeologists from the Danish Castle Centre and Aarhus University announced the discovery of a Viking fortress in a field belonging to Vallø Manor, located west of Køge on the east coast of...
Climate change was not to blame for the collapse of the Bronze Age
Archaeology News
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Climate change was not to blame for the collapse of the Bronze Age

November 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Scientists will have to find alternative explanations for a huge population collapse in Europe at the end of the Bronze Age as researchers prove definitively that climate change - commonly assumed to be responsible - could not...
Ancient DNA sheds light on the origin of Europeans
Palaeoanthropology
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Ancient DNA sheds light on the origin of Europeans

November 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Much of the evidence of where the first Europeans came from was originally derived from comparisons of skulls but our work looking at ancient DNA is revealing new insight, with results published this month in...
Climate capers of the past 600,000 years
Geology
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Climate capers of the past 600,000 years

November 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
If you want to see into the future, you have to understand the past. An international consortium of researchers under the auspices of the University of Bonn has drilled deposits on the bed of Lake Van (Eastern Turkey) which...
Life Originated in the Earth’s Crust
Geology
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Life Originated in the Earth’s Crust

November 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
This at least is what the geologist Prof. Dr. Ulrich Schreiber and the physico-chemist Prof. Dr. Christian Mayer of the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany are convinced of....
High-Tech Authentication of Ancient Artifacts
Technology
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High-Tech Authentication of Ancient Artifacts

November 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In ongoing studies, Rose and his colleague Jane Walsh have now analyzed hundreds of artifacts, including carved stone figurines and masks and ceramic pieces from the ancient Olmec, Maya, Teotihuacan and Mezcala civilizations...
Tell-tales of war: Traditional stories highlight how ancient women survived
Heritage
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Tell-tales of war: Traditional stories highlight how ancient women survived

November 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Through the ages, women have suffered greatly because of wars. Consequently, to protect themselves and their offspring, our female ancestors may have evolved survival strategies specific to problems posed by warfare, says...
New Research Focuses TIGHAR’s Underwater Search for Earhart Plane
Archaeology News
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New Research Focuses TIGHAR’s Underwater Search for Earhart Plane

November 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Increasing confidence that a piece of aluminum aircraft debris found on a remote, uninhabited South Pacific atoll came from Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Electra has bolstered speculation that a sonar anomaly detected at a depth of...
What does it mean to be English?
Heritage
4

What does it mean to be English?

November 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
An epic new history of England offers some eye-catching conclusions on Englishness – suggesting, among other things, that a “remarkable” level of cultural unity and a relative openness to other cultures are both key...
Tools and primates: Opportunity, not necessity, is the mother of invention
Natural World
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Tools and primates: Opportunity, not necessity, is the mother of invention

November 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Whether you are a human being or an orang-utan, tools can be a big help in getting what you need to survive....
Did men evolve navigation skills to find mates?
Anthropology
1

Did men evolve navigation skills to find mates?

November 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A University of Utah study of two African tribes found evidence that men evolved better navigation ability than women because men with better spatial skills - the ability to mentally manipulate objects - can roam farther and have...
The cave paintings of Valltorta-Gassulla could be dated in absolute terms thanks to new analyses
Archaeology News
0

The cave paintings of Valltorta-Gassulla could be dated in absolute terms thanks to new analyses

November 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers presented the first characterisation of the black pigments used in the shelters of the Remígia cave, in the Valltorta-Gassulla area, between the Valencian regions of L’Alt Maestrat and La Plana (Castelló)....
Supercomputing Beyond Genealogy Reveals Surprising European Ancestors
Technology
0

Supercomputing Beyond Genealogy Reveals Surprising European Ancestors

November 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
What if you researched your family's genealogy, and a mysterious stranger turned out to be an...
Too many people, not enough water: Now and 2,700 years ago
Archaeology News
0

Too many people, not enough water: Now and 2,700 years ago

November 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Assyrian Empire once dominated the ancient Near East. At the start of the 7th century BC, it was a mighty military machine and the largest empire the Old World had yet seen....
Archaeologists discover remains of Ice Age infants in Alaska
Archaeology News
1

Archaeologists discover remains of Ice Age infants in Alaska

November 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The remains of two Ice Age infants, buried over 11,000 years ago at a site located in Alaska, represent the youngest human remains ever discovered in the northern part of North America, according to a new paper published in the...
Unique Roman Relief Discovered
Archaeology News
0

Unique Roman Relief Discovered

November 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Classical scholars from the Cluster of Excellence discover depiction of unknown god in Turkey – relics from 2,000 years of cult history...
A/C came standard on armoured dinosaur models
Palaeontology
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A/C came standard on armoured dinosaur models

November 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
armoured dinosaur modelsLed by palaeontologist Jason Bourke, a team of scientists at Ohio University used CT scans to record the anatomy of nasal passages in two different ankylosaur species. The team then modeled airflow through...
People of The Heath – Petersfield Museum’s Heath Barrow Project
ARCHAEOLOGY BLOG
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People of The Heath – Petersfield Museum’s Heath Barrow Project

November 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
This exciting four-year project was initiated by The Petersfield Museum to enable historians and archaeologists to understand who designed, constructed and venerated a collection of Bronze Age Burial Mounds....
Gene that once aided survival in the Arctic is found to have negative impact on health today
Anthropology
0

Gene that once aided survival in the Arctic is found to have negative impact on health today

November 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Millennia-old genetic variant that once provided advantages for survival in cold climates increases risk of hypoglycemia and infant...