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London Mapping Project
Archaeology
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London Mapping Project

August 31st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The London History Group was launched mid 2014 as a community engagement project, building on local knowledge to promote the less known historical sites of London and create an exciting story that can be traced on the...
Earliest known wooden toilet seat discovered at Vindolanda
Archaeology
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Earliest known wooden toilet seat discovered at Vindolanda

August 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
There are many examples of stone and marble seat benches from across the Roman Empire but this is believed to be the only surviving wooden seat, almost perfectly preserved in the anaerobic, oxygen free, conditions which exist at...
Flapping baby birds offer clues to origin of flight
Natural World
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Flapping baby birds offer clues to origin of flight

August 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
How did the earliest birds take wing? Did they fall from trees and learn to flap their forelimbs to avoid crashing? Or did they run along the ground and pump their “arms” to get...
Snails Tell of the Rise and Fall of the Tibetan Plateau
Natural World
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Snails Tell of the Rise and Fall of the Tibetan Plateau

August 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The rise of the Tibetan plateau — the largest topographic anomaly above sea level on Earth — is important for both its profound effect on climate and its reflection of continental dynamics....
Evolutionary history of honeybees revealed by genomics
Natural World
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Evolutionary history of honeybees revealed by genomics

August 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In a study published in Nature Genetics, researchers from Uppsala University present the first global analysis of genome variation in honeybees. The findings show a surprisingly high level of genetic diversity in honeybees, and...
Misunderstood worm-like fossil finds its place in the Tree of Life
Palaeontology
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Misunderstood worm-like fossil finds its place in the Tree of Life

August 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
One of the most bizarre-looking fossils ever found - a worm-like creature with legs, spikes and a head difficult to distinguish from its tail – has found its place in the evolutionary Tree of Life, definitively linking it with...
Oldest representative of a weird arthropod group
Palaeontology
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Oldest representative of a weird arthropod group

August 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Biologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have assigned a number of 435-million-year-old fossils to a new genus of predatory arthropods. These animals lived in shallow marine habitats and were far less...
Ancient Metal Workers Were Not Slaves But Highly Regarded Craftsmen
Archaeology
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Ancient Metal Workers Were Not Slaves But Highly Regarded Craftsmen

August 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Iron Age copper smelters were respected leaders with sophisticated skills, say Tel Aviv University...
Walking fish reveal how our ancestors evolved onto land
Natural World
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Walking fish reveal how our ancestors evolved onto land

August 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
About 400 million years ago a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods – today's amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and fins in a terrestrial...
Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills
Archaeology
1

Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills

August 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The manufacture of stone-tipped spears is a skill likely to have been learned by being passed from generation to generation through social or group...
Bronze Age wine cellar found in Israel
Archaeology
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Bronze Age wine cellar found in Israel

August 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A Bronze Age palace excavation reveals an ancient wine cellar, according to a study published August 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrew Koh from Brandeis University and...
Neanderthals ‘overlapped’ with modern humans for up to 5,400 years
Palaeoanthropology
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Neanderthals ‘overlapped’ with modern humans for up to 5,400 years

August 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Neanderthals and modern humans were both living in Europe for between 2,600 and 5,400 years, according to a new paper published in the journal, Nature. For the first time, scientists have constructed a robust timeline showing...
The nuclear legacy of Hiroshima is a global issue, how much of it is a trauma for everybody?
Conflict
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The nuclear legacy of Hiroshima is a global issue, how much of it is a trauma for everybody?

August 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Speaking in Hiroshima in the weeks preceding the sixty-ninth anniversary of the bombing of the city, Yoko Ono stood up for peace declaring that ‘No More Hiroshima’ is a global issue....
Huddersfield researcher traces Jack the Ripper’s forgotten victims
Heritage
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Huddersfield researcher traces Jack the Ripper’s forgotten victims

August 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
UNIVERSITY of Huddersfield researcher Charlotte Mallinson is turning Ripperology on its head....
Two ancient Maya cities discovered in the jungle of southeastern Mexico
Archaeology
1

Two ancient Maya cities discovered in the jungle of southeastern Mexico

August 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In the tropical forest of central Yucatan peninsula, two large Maya sites have been discovered by an archaeological expedition led by Ivan Šprajc, of the Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts (ZRC SAZU)....
SA’s Taung Child’s skull and brain not human-like in expansion
Palaeoanthropology
1

SA’s Taung Child’s skull and brain not human-like in expansion

August 26th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Taung Child, South Africa's premier hominin discovered 90 years ago by Wits University Professor Raymond Dart, never seizes to transform and evolve the search for our collective...
10 must see UNESCO World Heritage Sites
Fun and Interesting
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10 must see UNESCO World Heritage Sites

August 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
To date there are over 1000 UNESCO World Heritage Sites so it is pretty unlikely that one person will be able to see the whole cohort of beautiful sites. However, here listed are just 10 of the must see UNESCO World Heritage...
10 reasons when you know you’re a true archaeologist…
Archaeology
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10 reasons when you know you’re a true archaeologist…

August 25th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
10 reasons when you know you're a true...
Citizen scientists saving lives around deadly ‘Throat of Fire’ volcano
Natural World
0

Citizen scientists saving lives around deadly ‘Throat of Fire’ volcano

August 22nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Citizen scientists are saving lives of people living in the shadow of deadly volcanoes according to new research from the University of East Anglia....
Jurassic Welsh mammals were picky eaters, study finds
Palaeontology
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Jurassic Welsh mammals were picky eaters, study finds

August 20th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
For most people, mere mention of the word Jurassic conjures up images of huge dinosaurs chomping their way through lush vegetation – and each other. However, mammals and their immediate ancestors were also around in the...
Pre-Columbian Mycobacterial Genomes Reveal Seals as a Source of New World Human Tuberculosis
Natural World
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Pre-Columbian Mycobacterial Genomes Reveal Seals as a Source of New World Human Tuberculosis

August 20th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
Tuberculosis is one of the most persistent and deadliest infectious diseases in the world, killing one to two million people each...
Paleolithic diet of snails 10,000 years earlier than previously thought
Archaeology
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Paleolithic diet of snails 10,000 years earlier than previously thought

August 20th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
Paleolithic inhabitants of modern-day Spain may have eaten snails 10,000 years earlier than their Mediterranean neighbors, according to a study published August 20, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE....
Rome’s first emperor died 2000 years ago – his tomb is now used as a toilet
Archaeology
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Rome’s first emperor died 2000 years ago – his tomb is now used as a toilet

August 20th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
Augustus, who died 2000 years ago, was the first emperor of Rome. He brought peace after the turmoil in the republic after the assassination of Julius Caesar when he defeated the forces of Antony and Cleopatra....
Evolution of marine crocodilians constrained by ocean temperatures
Palaeontology
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Evolution of marine crocodilians constrained by ocean temperatures

August 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The ancestors of today’s crocodiles colonized the seas during warm phases and became extinct during cold phases, according to a new Anglo-French study, which establishes the link between marine crocodilian diversity and the...
£1.5 million aid for historic buildings
Heritage
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£1.5 million aid for historic buildings

August 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
More than £1.5 million has been awarded to help repair seven historic buildings across Scotland as part of Historic Scotland’s Building Repairs Grants...
500 million year reset for the immune system
Natural World
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500 million year reset for the immune system

August 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A single factor has the potential to reset the immune system of mice to a state similar to what it was 500 million years ago, a time when the first vertebrates...
Toothless ‘dragon’ pterosaurs dominated the Late Cretaceous skies
Palaeontology
1

Toothless ‘dragon’ pterosaurs dominated the Late Cretaceous skies

August 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new study provides an exciting insight into the Late Cretaceous and the diversity and distribution of the toothless ‘dragon’ pterosaurs from the Azhdarchidae family. The research was published in the open access journal...
New home for an ‘evolutionary misfit’
Palaeontology
1

New home for an ‘evolutionary misfit’

August 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A worm-like creature with legs and spikes finally finds its place in the evolutionary tree of...
Bone Chemistry reveals royal lifestyle of Richard III
Archaeology
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Bone Chemistry reveals royal lifestyle of Richard III

August 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new study conducted by the British Geological Survey, in association with researchers at the University of Leicester, has explored the bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III and unveiled fascinating new details about the...
Luas Works Reveal Multiple Human Remains at College Green
Archaeology
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Luas Works Reveal Multiple Human Remains at College Green

August 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The archaeological team located an individual at a depth of 1.5m below the present ground surface, immediately north of the gates of Trinity College, Dublin. The individual was situated below the known level of post-medieval...
The Mummy’s Face: Solving an Ancient Mystery
Archaeology
1

The Mummy’s Face: Solving an Ancient Mystery

August 14th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
He looks almost Byzantine or Greek, gazing doe-eyed over the viewer’s left shoulder, his mouth forming a slight pout, like a star-struck lover or perhaps a fan of the races witnessing his favorite charioteer losing control of...
Embalming study ‘rewrites’ key chapter in Egyptian history
Archaeology
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Embalming study ‘rewrites’ key chapter in Egyptian history

August 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers from the Universities of York, Macquarie and Oxford have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought. The scientific...
Mind-Blowing Giant Crystals — What Can They Teach Us?
Natural World
3

Mind-Blowing Giant Crystals — What Can They Teach Us?

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Giant gypsum crystals -- some of which are in excess of 30 feet long and half a million years old -- are found deep within the Naica mine in Chihuahua, Mexico and are renowned for their spectacular beauty....
Climate change and drought in ancient times
Geology
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Climate change and drought in ancient times

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The influence of climate on agriculture is believed to be a key factor in the rise and fall of societies in the Ancient Near East. Dr. Simone Riehl of Tübingen University’s Institute for Archaeological Science and the...
Space-age technologies aim to uncover Britain’s heritage
Archaeology
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Space-age technologies aim to uncover Britain’s heritage

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A team from the University of Leicester is to investigate the potential use of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) technology to advance understanding of our...
Reconstructions show how some of the earliest animals lived…and died
Natural World
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Reconstructions show how some of the earliest animals lived…and died

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New three-dimensional reconstructions display how some of the world’s earliest animals developed, and offer some answers as to why they went...
Western Wall Wearing Away? Discovery of Extreme Erosion Process Could Guide New Preservation Techniques
Geology
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Western Wall Wearing Away? Discovery of Extreme Erosion Process Could Guide New Preservation Techniques

August 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem investigated erosion in the different types of limestone in the Western Wall located at the foot of Jerusalem’s Temple Mount. Stones comprised of large crystals were almost...
Ancient shellfish remains rewrite 10,000-year history of El Niño cycles
Archaeology
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Ancient shellfish remains rewrite 10,000-year history of El Niño cycles

August 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The planet’s largest and most powerful driver of climate changes from one year to the next, the El Niño Southern Oscillation in the tropical Pacific Ocean, was believed to have been weaker in ancient times due to the different...
Excavation of ancient well yields insight into Etruscan, Roman and medieval times
Archaeology
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Excavation of ancient well yields insight into Etruscan, Roman and medieval times

August 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
During a four-year-long excavation of an Etruscan well at the ancient Italian settlement of Cetamura del Chianti, a team led by a Florida State University archaeologist and art historian unveiled a wealth of artifacts spanning...
Top 10 deadliest volcanic eruptions
Fun and Interesting
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Top 10 deadliest volcanic eruptions

August 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Volcanoes are among the most devastating and dangerous natural forces in our past, but it is not just throughout history that they wrecked havoc on human life but right up to the 21st century. Their volatility and unreliability...