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UNCOVERING YEMEN
Archaeology News
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UNCOVERING YEMEN

October 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
2500 years ago, frankincense and myrhh burned throughout the kingdoms of Southern Arabia. 50 years ago, Wendell Phillips unearthed the sand-covered ruins along the ancient incense trading...
SEEMPUBS: maximum energy savings with minimum interventions for historic buildings
Heritage
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SEEMPUBS: maximum energy savings with minimum interventions for historic buildings

October 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Europe’s historic buildings attract visitors from across the world. However, keeping the popular historic sites energy-efficient without significant construction works can be somewhat of a challenge. The EU-funded project...
Council blind spot over hillfort housing jeopardises county plan, warn campaigners
Heritage
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Council blind spot over hillfort housing jeopardises county plan, warn campaigners

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Shropshire Council is gambling with public money and elector confidence by keeping housing allocations by Old Oswestry hillfort in its development masterplan, say...
Hyperspectral imaging shines light on the early Finns’ life in the Stone Age
Archaeology News
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Hyperspectral imaging shines light on the early Finns’ life in the Stone Age

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The 5,500 years old clay figurines found at community excavations in Vantaa, Finland in summer 2014, were recently scanned with SPECIM’s hyperspectral camera....
Science & Activism in the 21st Century : The Archaeoventurers Project
Archaeology News
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Science & Activism in the 21st Century : The Archaeoventurers Project

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The ArchaeoVenturers Project flips the script on traditional archaeology. ArchaeoVenturers Katie Paul (‘The Digger’) and Justine Benanty (‘The Diver’) explore the challenges facing our history today and the people who are...
Greenland Ice Sheet more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought
Natural World
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Greenland Ice Sheet more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A brand new model developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge has indicated that despite its apparent stability, the vast ice sheet covering most of Greenland is more sensitive to climate change than earlier...
Tooth serves as evidence of 220 million-year-old attack
Palaeontology
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Tooth serves as evidence of 220 million-year-old attack

September 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A tooth challenges beliefs about how ancient reptiles...
Ancient Human Genome from Southern Africa throws light on our origins
Ancient Encyclopaedia
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Ancient Human Genome from Southern Africa throws light on our origins

September 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The skeleton of a man who walked the earth 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tells us about ourselves as humans, and sheds some crucial light on our earliest common genetic...
Genetic Makeup of Europeans
Archaeology News
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Genetic Makeup of Europeans

September 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers compare ancient hunter-gatherers and early farmers to present-day human genomes and find that Europeans today trace their ancestry to three ancient...
Human genome was shaped by an evolutionary arms race with itself
Natural World
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Human genome was shaped by an evolutionary arms race with itself

September 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New findings by scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, suggest that an evolutionary arms race between rival elements within the genomes of primates drove the evolution of complex regulatory networks that...
Innovative Stone Age tools were not African invention, say researchers
Archaeology News
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Innovative Stone Age tools were not African invention, say researchers

September 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new discovery of thousands of Stone Age tools has provided a major insight into human innovation 325,000 years ago and how early technological developments spread across the world, according to research published in the journal...
Stone Age site challenges old archaeological assumptions about human technology
Ancient Encyclopaedia
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Stone Age site challenges old archaeological assumptions about human technology

September 26th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Local innovation rather than the expansion of the population is the reason behind the appearance of new technologies in Eurasia over 300,000 years...
Gleaming in the Dust – Ancient Antiquities Looted & Sold on International Markets
Ancient Encyclopaedia
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Gleaming in the Dust – Ancient Antiquities Looted & Sold on International Markets

September 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Gleaming in the Dust is a new audio documentary that reveals the extent to which ancient antiquities are being looted in Egypt and sold on international markets in London, Paris and New York....
New evidence of ancient multicellular life sets evolutionary timeline back 60 million years
Palaeontology
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New evidence of ancient multicellular life sets evolutionary timeline back 60 million years

September 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A Virginia Tech geobiologist with collaborators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found evidence in the fossil record that complex multicellularity appeared in living things about 600 million years ago – nearly 60...
Crossrail uncovers Brunel’s railway heritage
Archaeology News
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Crossrail uncovers Brunel’s railway heritage

September 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Remains of structures built by celebrated engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel for his Great Western Railway have been unearthed near Paddington in west...
Snail shells show high-rise plateau is much lower than it used to be
Geology
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Snail shells show high-rise plateau is much lower than it used to be

September 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Tibetan Plateau in south-central Asia, because of its size, elevation and impact on climate, is one of the world’s greatest geological...
First World War dead commemorated in new online archive blog
Archaeology News
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First World War dead commemorated in new online archive blog

September 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The University of Greenwich’s First World War casualties are being investigated in a new online project, with members of the public being urged to...
Answer to restoring lost island biodiversity found in fossils
Natural World
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Answer to restoring lost island biodiversity found in fossils

September 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Many native species have disappeared from tropical islands because of human activity, but University of Florida scientists have discovered how fossils can be used to restore lost...
New Hadrosaur Noses into Spotlight
Palaeontology
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New Hadrosaur Noses into Spotlight

September 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Call it the Jimmy Durante of dinosaurs‒ a recently discovered hadrosaur with a particularly distinctive nasal profile. The new dinosaur, named Rhinorex condrupus by palaeontologists from North Carolina State University and...
New high-resolution satellite image analysis: 5 of 6 Syrian World Heritage sites ‘exhibit significant damage’
Ancient Encyclopaedia
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New high-resolution satellite image analysis: 5 of 6 Syrian World Heritage sites ‘exhibit significant damage’

September 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In war-torn Syria, five out of six World Heritage sites now “exhibit significant damage” and some structures have even been “reduced to rubble”, according to new high-resolution satellite image analysis conducted by the...
First eyewitness accounts of mystery volcanic eruption
Geology
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First eyewitness accounts of mystery volcanic eruption

September 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The eruption occurred just before the 1815 Tambora volcanic eruption, which is famous for its overwhelming impact on climate worldwide, with 1816 given memorable names such as ’Eighteen-Hundred-and-Froze-to-Death’, the...
First Phase of Severn Princess restoration completed
Heritage
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First Phase of Severn Princess restoration completed

September 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Mabey Bridge apprentices successfully stabilise historic vessel ready for next stage of...
‘Lost chapel’ skeletons found holding hands after 700 years
Ancient Encyclopaedia
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‘Lost chapel’ skeletons found holding hands after 700 years

September 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Archaeologists from the University of Leicester uncover a trove of relics and remains at Chapel of St. Morrell in...
The Age of the Sahara desert
Natural World
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The Age of the Sahara desert

September 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A team of scientists from Norway, France and China revise the view that the Sahara desert has existed for only the last 2-3million...
New branch added to European family tree
Anthropology
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New branch added to European family tree

September 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Genetic analysis reveals present-day Europeans descended from at least 3, not 2, groups of ancient...
Iraq’s heritage faces new wave of destruction
Ancient Encyclopaedia
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Iraq’s heritage faces new wave of destruction

September 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Since early June, extremist armed groups, including ISIS, have controlled most of north-west of Iraq, from Mosul downward to falouja on the Euphrates and Tikrit on the...
Analysis of centuries-old skeletons in mass grave ‘inconclusive’
Ancient Encyclopaedia
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Analysis of centuries-old skeletons in mass grave ‘inconclusive’

September 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Further tests are to be carried out on skeletons recovered from a centuries-old mass grave in Durham...
Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after 5 centuries
Archaeology News
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Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after 5 centuries

September 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
First partial sequence of an ancient pig...
Study finds Great Barrier Reef is an effective wave absorber
Natural World
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Study finds Great Barrier Reef is an effective wave absorber

September 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Novel research has found that the Great Barrier Reef is an extraordinarily effective wave absorber, despite large gaps between the reefs. This means that landward of the reefs, waves are mostly related to local winds rather than...
How the British treated ‘hardcore’ Mau Mau women
Heritage
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How the British treated ‘hardcore’ Mau Mau women

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New research on the treatment of 'hardcore' female Mau Mau prisoners by the British in the late 1950s sheds new light on how ideas about gender, deviancy and mental health shaped colonial practices of...
Volunteers hope to unearth hidden history at medieval church in Hopton
Archaeology News
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Volunteers hope to unearth hidden history at medieval church in Hopton

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Residents will seek to unearth hidden history at a community archaeological dig to be held at a medieval ruined church in...
FREE COURSE Hadrian’s Wall – Life on the Roman Frontier
Uncategorized
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FREE COURSE Hadrian’s Wall – Life on the Roman Frontier

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Hadrian’s Wall stretches over 73 miles (117 km), from coast to coast in what is now Northern England....
Mosses survive climate catastrophes
Natural World
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Mosses survive climate catastrophes

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Mosses have existed on Earth for more than 400 million years. During this period they survived many climate catastrophes that wiped out more robust organisms such as, for example, dinosaurs....
NOAA team reveals forgotten ghost ships off Golden Gate
Archaeology News
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NOAA team reveals forgotten ghost ships off Golden Gate

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
San Francisco area divers provided valuable assistance to help identify long-lost...
The Gulf Stream kept going during the last Ice Age
Geology
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The Gulf Stream kept going during the last Ice Age

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The warm Atlantic water continued to flow into the icy Nordic seas during the coldest periods of the last Ice...
The creation of the Vuoksi River preceded a significant cultural shift
Archaeology News
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The creation of the Vuoksi River preceded a significant cultural shift

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The creation of the Vuoksi River and the subsequent rapid decrease in the water level of Lake Saimaa approximately 6,000 years ago revealed thousands of square kilometres of new, fertile land in eastern...
‘Jaws’ lived in Doncaster
Palaeontology
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‘Jaws’ lived in Doncaster

September 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Sharks, swamps and a tropical rainforest bursting with life – this isn’t exactly what comes to mind when you think of Yorkshire. But for the first time evidence of Doncaster’s 310-million-year-old past, including a...
Hitting the jackpot on a dig in Gernsheim: Long lost Roman fort discovered
Ancient Encyclopaedia
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Hitting the jackpot on a dig in Gernsheim: Long lost Roman fort discovered

September 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In the course of an educational dig in Gernsheim, located in the Hessain Ried, archaeologists from Frankfurt University have discovered a long lost Roman fort: A troop unit made up of approximately 500 soldiers (known as a...
Microscopic Diamond Suggests Cosmic Impact
Archaeology News
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Microscopic Diamond Suggests Cosmic Impact

September 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A novel study published in The Journal of Geology provides support for the theory that a cosmic impact event over North America some 13,000 years ago caused a major period of climate change known as the Younger Dryas stadial, or...
Scientists report first semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus
Palaeontology
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Scientists report first semiaquatic dinosaur, Spinosaurus

September 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Enormous predator was over 9 feet longer than largest Tyrannosaurus...